Stay Connected With Your Teen’s Electronic Worlds – In Memory of Audrie Pott, Age 15

15-year-old Audrie Potts from Saratoga, California, took her life after expressing her despair online about being sexually assaulted and cyber-bullied. Her parents only found these messages when searching for reasons after her death. According to some estimates, teens spend half their lives online. These electronic worlds are too dangerous for our kids to live in without the knowledge and guidance of the adults who love them.

Too many times, adults don’t discover online messages about cyber-bullying, parties with heavy drinking, or warning signs of despair or violence until after something terrible has happened, when the opportunity to take protective action is gone.

Penn State Sanctions Set New Path to Success

The NCAA’s penalties for the Penn State’s football program send a clear message from the national level that child safety should be put ahead football, winning, and hero worship. The message that the well-being of kids is more important than sports is revolutionary. By moving through this hard situation, Penn State Football, and the University as a whole, can develop a reputation of true excellence built on a foundation of integrity, courage, and safety.

Protect Your Child From Abduction: Safety Checklist to Prepare Kids to Go Without Adult Protection

Make sure your kids are prepared to avoid and escape from danger on the way to school, a friend’s house, the store, or anytime they go out without adult protection. Download a free one-page “Kidpower Safety Checklist for Parents” about how to prepare kids and assess to ensure they are ready to recognize potential danger and make safe choices immediately.

STOP THE BUS! Bullying of Older Bus Monitor Shows What Needs To Change

Watching the video of school bus monitor Karen Klein being cruelly bullied by four boys makes me want to stand up and shout, ‘STOP THE BUS!’ Parents and teachers need to teach kids how to recognize destructive behavior, resist peer pressure, speak up when they see someone acting unsafely, and get help. School staff, including bus monitors and playground supervisors, need training and support to stop kids from engaging in bullying of anyone in the moment.

Taking charge of safety before, during, and after a disaster

My heart aches with empathy for everyone whose lives are devastated by disasters. At the same time, watching the news over and over, feeling upset, and worrying about the bad things that might happen does not make anyone safer -it just makes us and our children more anxious. Instead, especially when things go wrong, we need to take charge of what each of us can do to keep our children and ourselves emotionally and physically safe.
Here are some ideas about what to do before, during, and after a disaster.

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